Geology Group

Banner photos: Rosedale Iron Works, by Tom Mutton; Conesby Quarry, by John Lewis 

In late 2016, inspired by the 2015 Geological Map project, a YPS group was formed for those with an interest in Geology, under the leadership of member Paul Thornley.

The group aims to promote an interest in geology among the wider membership, and the general public. In better times, it organises geological field trips and talks, some jointly with kindred organisations, and during the pandemic Paul is providing a virtual program. Anyone interested in joining the group should contact Paul, c/o The Lodge.

Geology in the time of Covid

Monthly Suggestions

I am releasing some notes on geological activities on a monthly basis: Most will be online, sometimes a link to a self-guided geological walk, some may offer limited access to small groups out in the field. Eventually we may offer live Zoom meetings

 Covid Notes for June 2021

Further notes on geology in the time of covid.

1.      a) Virtual Trips:

The Black Country Geopark gained UNESCO Global Geopark status in 2020. With its geology underlying and often hidden by its industrial heritage, there is much to see in the area.

There are two clips to watch: ‘Black Country Geopark’ and Crystal Mile Walk’

https://blackcountrygeopark.dudley.gov.uk/about/

One of the main sites to see is The Wren’s Nest and the geology trail leaflet. See the Dudley Bug

https://blackcountrygeopark.dudley.gov.uk/sites-to-see/wrens-nest-national-nature-reserve/

And much more available on the Black Country Geological Society website, under local geology

Geological Leaflets and Guides

b) Virtual Events and Talks:

The Yorkshire Geological Society

17th June online and YouTube. Simon Mitchell of Kingston Jamaica: The Cretaceous History of Jamaica: a time of volcanoes & carbonate platforms with rudist bivalves.

The links for registering or watching on line are:
https://www.yorksgeolsoc.org.uk/events-list/webinar-the-cretaceous-rocks-of-jamaica

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzBPkcmYZbbLnaez7_tuohg

The Geological Society continue talks for 2021: The Year of Space.

https://www.geolsoc.org.uk/space21/lectures

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzhX_LOB1xUwIDmckTrPOqw

2.      Women and Men in Geology:

Mary Morland (1797-1857) was already a collector and student of fossils and minerals, as well as a scientific illustrator, when she met (and married) William Buckland (see my notes for May 2021 for William Buckland).

She had illustrated some of George Cuvier’s work and later made models of fossils for the Oxford Museum and repaired broken fossils. She assisted her husband by taking notes of his observations and illustrating his work. After the death of her husband, she continued working on marine zoophytes.

https://www.geolsoc.org.uk/Library-and-Information-Services/Exhibitions/Women-and-Geology/Mary-Buckland

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Buckland

3.      Online Study: Yorkshire-based.

Liam Herringshaw is also running CLL course on 19th June, Exploring the Landscape of Yorkshire

https://www.york.ac.uk/lifelonglearning/saturday/

Liam is also running an online course for Hidden Horizons, 7 to 9pm – 30 June 2021

An Introduction to the fossils of the Yorkshire Dales

An Introduction to the fossils of the Yorkshire Dales – Online Course – 7 to 9pm – 30 June 2021

The Open University has a free Open Learn course on Geological Processes in the UK

https://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/geology/geological-processes-the-british-isles/content-section-0?active-tab=description-tab

4.      Real Events and Trips outside:

Yorkshire Geological Society has its President’s Day on 26th June at North Lincs Museum

There is an optional Annual Dinner afterwards. (Booking required for dinner only)

Meet from 1pm. https://www.yorksgeolsoc.org.uk/events-list/presidents-day-annual-dinner

1:30pm – Tour of museum displays (including the ‘Scunthorpe Pliosaur’)

2:30pm – 5:00pm – Afternoon Lecture series

·       Presidential Address 2 (Paul Hildreth) “The Lower Cretaceous ‘East Lindsey Group’ – a jewel in the geological crown of Lincolnshire”

·       Support Lecture 1 (Mike Oates) – “A Cretaceous Conundrum — the last days of the Market Weighton High’’

·       Support Lecture 2 (John Green) – “Early Cretaceous ichthyosaurs from Lincolnshire: their local and national significance”

Sunday 27th June 10.15am-1.30pm. YGS Field Trip. Booking required.

The Lower Cretaceous rocks of Claxby, Lincolnshire and the site of the Claxby Ironstone Mines

https://www.yorksgeolsoc.org.uk/events-list/the-lower-cretaceous-rocks-of-claxby-lincolnshire-claxby-ironstone-mines

Hidden Horizons are running Hidden Geology Walks with Liam Herringshaw on 14th and 28th June at Staithes and Filey.

Hidden Geology Walks

5.      Our Museum of the Month:

The YGS event on 26th June is to be held in North Lincolnshire Museum in Scunthorpe. See my notes from May 2021.

The Natural History Museum, London. So much to look at, ignoring all the dinosaurs for the moment. See the section on the Wold Cottage meteorite, from Wold Newton, East Riding.

https://www.nhm.ac.uk/discover/the-wold-cottage-meteorite.html

Browse the collections and read about ammonites.

https://www.nhm.ac.uk/discover/what-is-an-ammonite.html

6.      Books and Mags:

Steve Peacock: Geology for Walkers.

Self-published so only available at Amazon at present.

7.      News: Volcanic eruptions

La Soufriere, St Vincent from 9th April

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2021_eruption_of_La_Soufri%C3%A8re

Fagradalsfjall volcano, Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland. Started mid-March.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/world-56512554

https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg25033310-300-more-fissures-are-opening-up-at-the-fagradalsfjall-volcano-in-iceland/

Mt. Nyiragongo volcano in DR Congo. 22nd May

The eruption near the large DRC city of Goma is threatening to repeat the partial destruction of the city in 2002 from a previous eruption.

Covid Notes for May 2021

1.      a) Virtual Trips:

Try the North Pennines AONB. This is also a UNESCO Global Geopark.

Area guides

The Whin Sill is particularly dramatic

Geology and landscape


https://www.northpennines.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/North-Pennines-Geodiversity-Action-Plan-2018-to-2022.pdf

b) Virtual Events and Talks:

Leeds Geological Society Thursday 6th May, starting at 7.15 p.m. Dr Jed Atkinson of Leeds
‘Shifting Sands and Devil’s Toenails: Jurassic stratigraphy at Redcar’
If you wish to join, please Email the LGA Secretary lga.sec@btinternet.com

Café Sci Online Wednesday 5th May 7.30 pm. Paul Thornley on ‘Towards UNESCO Geopark Status for East Yorkshire’.

YPS Online talk Tuesday 11th May 7.30 pm.  Professor John Marshall of Southampton on the Devonian-Carboniferous Extinction event.

The Yorkshire Geological Society has a Yorkshire Geology Weekend. All online.
7th, 8th, 9th May. 4 pm Talks on Dorothy Rayner, Yorkshire dinosaurs and Horton Quarry.

20th May 4 pm Chris Jackson of Manchester. ‘Hot Rocks Beneath Our Feet’
Register at (or watch live on YGS YouTube channel)              https://www.yorksgeolsoc.org.uk/events

The Geological Society run talks for each year on a theme. 2021 is the Year of Space.
A few of the talks have passed and some are sold out. But all are or will be available on their YouTube channel. They also run public lectures online and YouTube
https://www.geolsoc.org.uk/space21/lectures
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzhX_LOB1xUwIDmckTrPOqw

2.      Women and Men in Geology:

With the 200th Anniversary of Kirkland Cave and then YPS, it is time to start looking at –
William Buckland (1784-1856). He investigated the fossil bones and coprolites, identifying some of them and experimented with the effects of hyena gnawing on bones and their faeces. Buckland’s views developed, over a few years, from a great flood theory of a deluge of water sweeping bones into a cave to an appreciation that bones represented ancient communities of hyenas from a time when life and climate were very different.
He wrote Reliquiae Diluvianae (1823; “Relics of the Deluge”) and Geology and Mineralogy Considered with Reference to Natural Theology (1836), published as one of the Bridgewater Treatises.
http://www.oum.ox.ac.uk/learning/htmls/buckland.htm
https://makingscience.royalsociety.org/s/rs/people/fst00048325
https://whitbymuseum.org.uk/whats-here/collections/fossils/kirkdale-cave/
https://www.bshs.org.uk/travel-guide-kirkdale-cave
http://nymcc.org.uk/kirkdale-cave/
https://www.ypsyork.org/about-yps/yps-history/1822-2/

3.      Online Study: Yorkshire-based. The following carry over from Last month:

York University CLL and Liam Herringshaw. York University CLL course
The Geology of the Yorkshire Dales is being repeated on 22nd May.
https://store.york.ac.uk/short-courses/centre-for-lifelong-learning/short-courses/the-geology-of-the-yorkshire-dales-second-cohort

Liam is also running CLL courses on 7th and 19th June, Exploring the Landscape of York and Exploring the Landscape of Yorkshire
https://www.york.ac.uk/lifelonglearning/saturday/

4.      Trips outside: Yorkshire-based. (North Pennines within reach, see #1.)

To accompany the Geopark talk on 5th May, look at:
Jurassic and Cretaceous rocks of the Market Weighton area – an excursion
http://earthwise.bgs.ac.uk/index.php/Jurassic_and_Cretaceous_rocks_of_the_Market_Weighton_area_-_an_excursion.

Rifle Butts is the site of late Cretaceous Northern Province Chalk sitting unconformably on Lower Jurassic mudstones, demonstrating the effect of the geologically-important Market Weighton Block; a putative granitic batholith. Walk on a meltwater spillway now a disused railway. On a sunny day, the chalk flowers flourish and the birds sing.

Hidden Horizons are running Hidden Geology Walks with Liam Herringshaw on 31st May, 14th and 28th June at Burniston Bay, Staithes and Filey.
https://hiddenhorizons.co.uk/collections/expert-geology-walks

5.      Our Museum of the Month:

North Lincolnshire Museum in Scunthorpe. This has an excellent display on the Jurassic Seas, including the Frodingham Ironstone (which created the iron and steel town of Scunthorpe) and a recent discovery of the Jurassic Scunthorpe Pliosaur. Not much online, better to visit when open, though there is a 3-D virtual tour available.

Visit North Lincolnshire Museum

Prehistoric sea monster found in North Lincolnshire


https://www.thecollectionmuseum.com/assets/downloads/IS_geology_1_the_jurassic_sea.pdf
6.      Books and Mags:

Deborah Cadbury: The Dinosaur Hunters.
Buckland gave the first description of a dinosaur, Megalosaurus, though Robert Owen named Dinosauria. Buckland was the midwife of the rivalry between Gideon Mantell and Robert Owen.
https://www.abebooks.co.uk/servlet/SearchResults?isbn=1857029631&cm_sp=mbc-_-ISBN-_-all

Ross Barnett: The Missing Lynx, The Past and Future of Britain’s Lost Mammals.

From last month. We hope the author will talk to YPS about Kirkdale Cave.

https://www.bloomsbury.com/author/ross-barnett

Paul Thornley  30/04/21

Covid Notes for April 2021

1. a) Virtual Trips:

Arran Aspiring UNESCO Global Geopark.
Touring Britain may still not be possible, but Arran Geopark website will take you for many walks round this remarkable island with its dramatic scenery. https://www.arrangeopark.co.uk/
Look though the ‘Our Landscape’ links, then look for the ‘Arran Geopark Map’ and work your way through the six walk leaflets.            
https://www.arrangeopark.co.uk/arran-geopark-map/

b) Virtual Events and Talks:

Leeds Geological Association has an online talk on:
‘A re-evaluation of glacial Lake Pickering’
Thursday 15th April, starting at 7.15 p.m. Dr Laura Eddey of Sheffield University.
https://www.leedsga.org.uk/abstract.html
If you wish to join, please Email the LGA Secretary lga.sec@btinternet.com

The Yorkshire Geological Society has an online talk on the Whin Sill, 22nd April 4pm
Doug Robinson, The Whin Sill and its Contact Metamorphism in the Cow Green Boreholes, Upper Teesdale  
Register at (or watch live on YGS YouTube channel)
https://www.yorksgeolsoc.org.uk/events-list/the-whin-sill-and-its-contact-metamorphism-in-the-cow-green-boreholes-upper-teesdale

Looking ahead to May, Yorkshire Geology Day has morphed into three webinars on successive days 7th, 8th, 9th May. Dorothy Rayner, Yorkshire dinosaurs and Horton Quarry.
Register at (or watch live on YGS YouTube channel)              https://www.yorksgeolsoc.org.uk/events

2. Women and Men in Geology:

Dr Dorothy Rayner (1912-2003) The First Female President of the Yorkshire Geological Soc.
She was one of the first women to be appointed to a tenured academic post in any English university geology department, joining university of Leeds in 1939 and serving for 38 years.
She attended Cambridge University before it awarded degrees to female students but it did award her PhD in 1938.
https://sp.lyellcollection.org/content/506/1/201
The second 1981 edition of her ‘The Stratigraphy of the British Isles’ is still available from Cambridge as a reprint and from other second hand sources. https://www.cambridge.org/gb/academic/subjects/earth-and-environmental-science/sedimentology-and-stratigraphy/stratigraphy-british-isles-2nd-edition?format=PB&isbn=9780521299619
Patrick Boylan will give the YGS webinar on her life and work, Friday 7th May
https://www.yorksgeolsoc.org.uk/events-list/webinar-dr-dorothy-rayner-the-first-female-president-of-the-yorkshire-geological-society

3.      Online Study: Yorkshire-based.

York University CLL and Liam Herringshaw. York University CLL course
The Geology of the Yorkshire Dales is being repeated on 22nd May.
https://store.york.ac.uk/short-courses/centre-for-lifelong-learning/short-courses/the-geology-of-the-yorkshire-dales-second-cohort

Liam is also running CLL courses on 7th and 19th June, Exploring the Landscape of York and Exploring the Landscape of Yorkshire
https://www.york.ac.uk/lifelonglearning/saturday/

4. Trips outside: Yorkshire-based. (Arran too far at present)

Roundhay Park, NE of Leeds, has an excellent geology trail covering a fault in the Carboniferous succession. The guide may be downloaded at the friends of Roundhay Park website              https://forp.org/explore-the-park/
Or bought from their shop at £1, including postage!               https://forp.org/product/t2/

Nearby, try a trip to middle Carboniferous exposures of the Millstone Grit on opposite sides of the Harrogate Anticline:

Millstone Grit of Almscliff Crag and Harlow Car, near Harrogate – an excursion
From Yorkshire Rocks and Landscape, YGS
http://earthwise.bgs.ac.uk/index.php/Millstone_Grit_of_Almscliff_Crag_and_Harlow_Car,_near_Harrogate_-_an_excursion

Hidden Horizons are running Hidden Geology Walks with Liam Herringshaw on 31st May, 14th and 28th June at Burniston Bay, Staithes and Filey.
Hidden Geology Walks

5.      Our Museum of the Month:

Lyme Regis Museum celebrates its centenary in 2021. Lyme Regis was the home of Mary Anning, who featured in the February notes. And the museum is on the site of her Fossil Shop. Their website has a section on Mary Anning
https://www.lymeregismuseum.co.uk/visit-us/the-mary-anning-experts/
And their section on ‘Collections & Research’ is worth exploring.
https://www.lymeregismuseum.co.uk/collections-research/

6.      Books and Mags:

Ross Barnett: The Missing Lynx, The Past and Future of Britain’s Lost Mammals.
Palaeontologist Ross Barnett looks at fossil discoveries and other evidence to explore lost species and the ecological significance of their disappearance. Strongly recommended.
https://www.bloomsbury.com/author/ross-barnett
Paul Thornley  07/04/21

Covid Notes for March 2021

1.      a) Virtual Trips:

Roger Suthren, University of Derby, has a website virtual-geology.info with some virtual field trips for students at Derby in 2020. Staithes, North Yorkshire

A description of the Middle Lias (Lower Jurassic) of Staithes (NW of Whitby) is at https://wessexcoastgeology.soton.ac.uk/staithes.htm

And the field trip at     http://www.virtual-geology.info/VFT-GeoEnergy/Staithes.html

b) Virtual Events and Talks:

The Yorkshire Geological Society has an online talk 4pm 25th March.

Prof. Chris Greenwell— Lead in the way: developing low-cost passive remediation methods for legacy metal mine pollution    Register at (or watch on YGS YouTube channel)
https://www.yorksgeolsoc.org.uk/registrationgreenwell 

Also, still available on YouTube is a YGS talk from 25th February (watch by 11th march)
Nick Shaw – A new (exciting) opportunity for future geothermal energy in Yorkshire
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ICxbTQnhWRA&ab_channel=YorkshireGeologicalSociety

2.      Women and Men in Geology:

Lewis (also Louis) Hunton 1814-1838. English Pioneer in Ammonite Biostratigraphy.

In any discussion of the historical development of what was later to be named Biostratigraphy it is often assumed that a modern basis for the subject had already been reached by the cumulative work in the subject up to 1815; culminating in that of William Smith (1769-1839) and Alexandre Brongniart (1770-1847). But to this time fossils had only been used to identify (and discriminate between) often repetitive lithological units or to establish a relationship between rock units in different areas. The practical demonstration that particular lithological units could be regularly subdivided with significant consequences, on the basis of their contained fossils was a later achievement over several generations. One of the first to free stratigraphical palaeontology from such a lithological control was the forgotten Englishman Louis Hunton. (Hugh Torrens 1984).

Lewis was from a family of Alum Works managers in Loftus, on the NE Yorkshire Coast. Alum is found in the Upper Lias (Lower Jurassic) along with many fossil reptiles and ammonites. He wrote his-later influential-paper on the limited vertical range of specific fossils and use for geological tests at the age of 21 and died from tuberculosis 2 years later. The following article is from the Tees Valley Wildlife Trust
https://www.teeswildlife.org/what-we-do/past-projects/alum-alchemy-and-ammonites/alum/lewis-hunton/
Read more at
https://www.nyma.org.uk/_webedit/uploaded-files/All%20Files/Voice%20of%20the%20Moors/VOICE-115.pdf
(pages 6-7)
https://www.nyma.org.uk/_webedit/uploaded-files/All%20Files/History%20Tree/2%3A%20Louis%20Hunton%2C%20a%20Scientist%20who%20Changed%20the%20World.pdf
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lewis_Hunton

3.      Online Study: Yorkshire-based.

York University CLL and Liam Herringshaw. Saturday York University CLL course

The Geology of the Yorkshire Dales    Saturday 20 March 2021, 2.00pm to 5:00 PM https://www.york.ac.uk/lifelonglearning/dates/202021/spring/saturdaycourses/thegeologyoftheyorkshiredales/    

If the course is full, it is being repeated on 22nd May.
https://store.york.ac.uk/short-courses/centre-for-lifelong-learning/short-courses/the-geology-of-the-yorkshire-dales-second-cohort

4.       Trips outside: Yorkshire-based.

To accompany the virtual trip to Staithes, when travel is permitted, try
Lower Jurassic rocks between Staithes and Port Mulgrave – an excursion
From Yorkshire Rocks and Landscape, YGS
http://earthwise.bgs.ac.uk/index.php/Lower_Jurassic_rocks_between_Staithes_and_Port_Mulgrave_-_an_excursion

And to accompany the notes in 2. is the 4-mile Lewis Hunton walking trail from Loftus
https://www.walkingloftusandthenorthyorkshirecoast.com/self-guided-walks

Hidden Horizons are running Hidden Geology Walks with Liam Herringshaw on 31st March and 1st April at Ravenscar and Burniston Bay
https://hiddenhorizons.co.uk/collections/expert-geology-walks

5.      Our Museum of the Month:

To accompany the notes on the North East Yorkshire Coast, Lower Jurassic, Hunton and Alum I shall allow The Whitby Museum and its collection to have a repeat mention (from November)

6.      Books and Mags:

Roger Osborne has two books on the NE Yorkshire Coast. From Hightide publishing. £5 each.

The Dinosaur Coast, Yorkshire Rocks, Fossils and Landscape.
Pocket edition 2015, but a larger format version from 2001 can also be found.

Yorkshire’s Jurassic Fossils. Pocket edition 2019

Paul Thornley  02/03/21

Late January and into February Extra! 

Stones in Museum Gardens 
Click on this link to learn about the geology on your doorstep.
The article describes an ongoing project to demonstrate the wealth of geological material to be found in the beautiful surroundings of Museum Gardens.

Covid Notes for February 2021

1.  a) Virtual Trips:

The Yorkshire Geological Society have added a Field Guide to the Geology of Graves Park, Sheffield to their website
https://www.yorksgeolsoc.org.uk/virtualfieldtrips/onlinefieldguides
(The advertised Google Earth tour of Graves Park is not yet available)

b) Virtual Events and Talks:

The Yorkshire Geological Society has an online talk on New Light on the Neanderthals: Music, Art, Rope-Making, and now a possible link to COVID-19. Professor Patrick Boylan
Wednesday, 3 February 2021 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm. Register beforehand on the link;
https://www.yorksgeolsoc.org.uk/events/new-light-on-the-neanderthals-music-art-rope-making-and-now-a-possible-link-to-covid-19

This will be available afterwards on the Yorkshire Geological Society YouTube channel.
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzBPkcmYZbbLnaez7_tuohg

The YGS talk on the Geology of Islay by David Webster on 21st January is also now available on the same channel. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzBPkcmYZbbLnaez7_tuohg

2.   Women and Men in Geology:

Mary Anning. A statue is to be erected at Lyme Regis, Dorset, to Mary Anning, the fossil collector and discoverer of fossil marine reptiles and fish from the cliffs around Lyme. The costs were crowd-funded from an appeal by 13-year-old Evie Swire.

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2021/jan/19/statue-fossil-hunter-mary-anning-erected-campaign-lyme-regis

Several of the Early Jurassic marine fossils at the Natural History Museum and elsewhere were her finds, ichthyosaurs, plesiosaurs, pterosaurs as well as ammonites, belemnites and brachiopods. The Deep Oceans section of the Yorkshire’s Jurassic World exhibition at the Yorkshire Museum has on display the Yorkshire examples of this era. (When it reopens)

Many of the noted geologists and palaeontologists of the C19th examined her discoveries and discussed anatomy with her. They often presented results to societies and in papers without acknowledging the collector, as often happened at the time. Henry De La Beche sold copies of his painting of Jurassic time, Duria Antiquior, to raise funds to support Mary Anning.

https://www.nhm.ac.uk/discover/mary-anning-unsung-hero.html

https://www.lymeregismuseum.co.uk/collection/mary-anning/

3.      Online Study: Yorkshire-based.

York University CLL and Liam Herringshaw. Saturday York University CLL courses
Jurassic Beasts of the Dinosaur Coast  Saturday 27 February 2021, 2.00pm to 5:00 PM

https://www.york.ac.uk/lifelonglearning/dates/202021/spring/saturdaycourses/jurassicbeastsofthedinosaurcoast/

The Geology of the Yorkshire Dales    Saturday 20 March 2021, 2.00pm to 5:00 PM
https://www.york.ac.uk/lifelonglearning/dates/202021/spring/saturdaycourses/thegeologyoftheyorkshiredales/

Both courses appear to be full, but a waiting list often produces a repeat to the session.

4.       Trips outside: Yorkshire-based.

Healaugh Church West Riding, St John the Baptist. York Wetherby back road.
The Church is often open to visitors, even at this difficult time.
The Church is mainly 12th century, of beautiful magnesium limestone with a magnificent south doorway and corbels, chancel arch with interlaced carving on the pillars and a remarkable alabaster altar tomb bearing effigies of Lord Wharton in full armour, and his 2 wives. The sides of the tomb show the children.
https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1316655
https://ecclesiarum.wordpress.com/yorkshire/healaugh-st-john-the-baptist/
https://www.crsbi.ac.uk/view-item?key=SXsiUCI6eyJ2YWx1ZSI6ImhlYWxhdWdoIiwib3BlcmF0b3IiOjEsImZ1enp5UHJlZml4TGVuZ3RoIjozLCJmdXp6eU1pblNpbWlsYXJpdHkiOjAuNSwibWF4U3VnZ2VzdGlvbnMiOjUsImFsd2F5c1N1Z2dlc3QiOm51bGx9LCJGIjoiZXlKMElqcGJObDE5In0&WINID=1612029246303#y_liP-4sqksAAAF06bKhcg/13125

The church was originally dedicated to St Helen; an early Saxon cross/grave marker discovered in the churchyard in the 19th century suggests a long-term use of the site. The building is on Church Hill on the edge of a steep slope overlooking a former glacial lake.

https://chacklepie.com/ascorpus/catvol8.php?pageNum_urls=96

One story is that the pock marks in the stone on the South wall of the chancel were from musket balls as prisoners were executed after the Battle of Marston Moor (about 4 kilometres away).

Nearby Healaugh Priory was founded towards the end of the 12th century. Wighill and Walton churches are both nearby and 12th century.
https://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/YKS/ARY/Healaugh

5.      Our Museum of the Month:

Oxford Museum of Natural History
The museum has a collection of dinosaurs found in the county, marine reptiles, minerals and petrology. Try a virtual tour.

https://www.oumnh.ox.ac.uk/
The columns surrounding the main hall inside are made decorative rocks from the British Isles  and were planned by John Phillips.

http://www.oum.ox.ac.uk/learning/pdfs/columns.pdf
http://www.oum.ox.ac.uk/learning/museum.htm

6.      Books and Mags:

Books on the work of Mary Anning:
Mary Anning 1799-1847 A Life on the Rocks. Nigel J Clarke
https://www.nigelclarkepublications.co.uk/index.php?page=books
The Fossil Woman. The Life of Mary Anning. Tom Sharpe
https://www.dovecotepress.com/shop/new-books/the-fossil-woman-a-life-of-mary-anning-by-tom-sharpe/

Other books by Tracy Chevalier, Patricia Pierce and Shelley Emling are available

Paul Thornley  30/01/21

Covid Notes for January 2021

Further notes on geology in the time of covid.  Hogmanay edition, with a Scottish theme.

1.      a) Virtual Trips: The Scottish Geological Trust have talks, both live and on YouTube

Events

Mull and Iona, a geological journey

Geological Tour of Glasgow Necropolis

b) Virtual Events and Talks:

The BBC Series from 2010, Men of Rock with Professor Iain Stewart
is available on YouTube. Just search YouTube for each title and choose a link to play.

Men of Rock Deep time
Men of Rock Moving Mountains
Men of Rock The Big Freeze

The Yorkshire Geological Society has an online talk on the Geology of Islay by David Webster
January 21st 4pm. To register for free, go to:
https://www.yorksgeolsoc.org.uk/events/online-lecture-islay

2.      Women and Men in Geology:

Arthur Holmes made important contributions to radiometric dating of rocks and the Earth and to the study of continental drift through convection currents in the Earth’s mantle. His book. The Principles of Physical Geology from 1944 was still being published in 1993.

Arthur Holmes

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Holmes

https://www.e-education.psu.edu/earth520/node/1808

3.      Online Study: Yorkshire-based.

Liam Herringshaw and Hidden Horizons are offering two courses in January on fossils:

An Introduction to Fossils and Yorkshire Coast Fossils, see

Online Events

York University CLL eight-week course taught by Laura Eddey is still available

Introduction to the Physical Environment. Starting 20th January. 7 pm. ‘climate, soils, hydrology, geomorphology, glaciation, geology and biogeography’

https://www.york.ac.uk/lifelonglearning/dates/202021/spring/wednesdaycourses/introductiontothephysicalenvironment/

4.       Trips outside: Yorkshire-based.

Liam Herringshaw and Hidden Horizons are hoping to run outdoor Expert Group Walks starting in February with Jurassic Ravenscar and Tracking Yorkshire’s Dinosaurs:

Hidden Geology Walks

5.      Our Museum of the Month:

National Museum of Scotland, in Edinburgh.

Although currently closed, The Beginnings Gallery, very informatively includes the geological story of Scotland, rather confusingly under the title of History and Archaeological Galleries.

Available is a series of articles and films on a joint research project, Closing Romer’s Gap:

The recent discovery of the earliest Carboniferous fossil vertebrate tetrapods that emerged onto land, the ecology of the land they inhabited and an account of the latest analytical methods for non-destructive examination and recording of these fossils

https://www.nms.ac.uk/explore-our-collections/stories/natural-world/closing-romers-gap/

https://www.nms.ac.uk/collections-research/our-research/highlights-of-previous-projects/the-tweed-project-evolution-s-missing-chapter/

6.      Books and Mags:

Arthur Holmes. The Principles of Physical Geology

Although he died in 1965, this work has introduced many students to geology. The 1993 edition is updated and edited by Donald Duff.

7.      Mad Extra:

The Amoeba People, dressed as Nasa scientists from the 1960’s, relate accounts of Earth’s geological science back to their home planet, through song.

Paul Thornley

28/12/20

Covid Notes for December 2020

Where there is a huge amount of choice on a website, I have chosen only one or two activities.

1. a) Virtual Trips: The Geological History of Yorkshire from Yorkshire Branch of OUGS

https://ougs.org/files/yor/reports/The-Geology-of-Yorkshire.pdf

b) Virtual Events and Talks

Geologists’ Association had a free Festival of Geology set of four talks on 7th Nov 2020.

These talks are available to view on their website.

Volcanoes and drones, Tideway tunnel and geology under London, Extinctions at Devonian/Carboniferous boundary and The Day the Dinosaurs Died (Cretaceous/Paleogene)

https://festivalofgeology.org.uk/lectures-and-break-out-rooms/

The Yorkshire Geological Society has 4 Christmas Lectures, 1st, 3rd, 8th, 10th December

https://www.yorksgeolsoc.org.uk/events    

https://www.yorksgeolsoc.org.uk/ygs-xmas-lectures

2. Women and Men in Geology:

Dr Emma Liu of UCL Earth Sciences gave the talk on Volcanoes and drones at the GA festival mentioned in 1b) above. See her profile, links and blog. Her mastery of geo-chemistry, physics, technology and geology is outstanding.

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/earth-sciences/people/academic/dr-emma-liu

Five hundred miles from civilisation: Exploring active volcanism in the South Sandwich Islands

https://www.cam.ac.uk/stories/activevolcano

3. Online Study:

York University CLL has an eight-week course taught by Laura Eddey

Introduction to the Physical Environment. Starting 20th January. 7 pm.

‘climate, soils, hydrology, geomorphology, glaciation, geology and biogeography’

https://www.york.ac.uk/lifelonglearning/dates/202021/spring/wednesdaycourses/introductiontothephysicalenvironment/

The Open University have a six-part course on YouTube, Geological Time

4.      Trips outside (self-guided) Part Two

In these days when so much is closed, it is still possible to examine a wide range of building stones by examining the outside of churches.

Church towers often contain the oldest stones (in terms of quarrying, if not deposition) and several such towers locally contain Roman, Anglo-Saxon, Medieval and Modern stones.

St Mary Bishophill Junior (York). The lower part of the tower has herringbone work, probably just pre-conquest, with reclaimed stone and rubble from Roman, Anglo-Saxon and Viking buildings. The full YAT fasicule is included for extra study. The Corpus of Anglo-Saxon sculpture has eleven entries for the church.

http://www.historyofyork.org.uk/themes/anglo-scandinavian-york/church-of-st-marys-bishophill-junior

https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5c62d8bb809d8e27588adcc0/t/5cc8609e419202c81dbf79da/1556635826784/low+res+AY8-2_StMaryBishophill.pdf

http://www.ascorpus.ac.uk/catvol3.php?pageNum_urls=239&totalRows_urls=288

St Helen’s Church Skipwith. The C11th tower clearly has good Roman gritstones, probably taken from a near-by villa site. Archaeology has shown an even earlier church underneath. Several features appear to be Roman details in tower arch and ground floor windows. The interior of the tower contains the Ragnarok graffito.

Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture identifies many features

https://www.crsbi.ac.uk/view-item?key=WXsiUCI6eyJUZXJtcyI6InNraXB3aXRoIn0sIkYiOiJleUowSWpwYk5sMTkifQ&WINID=1604773497800#y_liP-4sqksAAAF06bKhcg/3531

Other photos at

http://www.greatenglishchurches.co.uk/html/skipwith.html

Brief archaeology at first link. Comprehensive one at second:

https://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/archiveDS/archiveDownload?t=arch-3817-1/dissemination/pdf/Church_Archaeology_Volume_11_pdfs/churarch011_035-038_hall.pdf

https://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/archiveDS/archiveDownload?t=arch-1642-1/dissemination/pdf/SNY11486.pdf

5. Our Museum of the Month: Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences

You can get lost for hours inside the Museum, whether visiting in person or online:

http://www.sedgwickmuseum.org/index.php?page=the-galleries

6. Books and Mags

Kieran D. O’Hara’s A Brief History of Geology is sitting on my table for when I have some moments free.

https://www.cambridge.org/gb/academic/subjects/earth-and-environmental-science/earth-science-general-interest/brief-history-geology?format=HB#

https://www.abebooks.co.uk/servlet/BookDetailsPL?bi=30683287890&cm_sp=Searchmod-_-NullResults-_-BDP

Paul Thornley  7/11/20

November 2020

1.      a) Virtual Trips:

The Yorkshire Geological Society YouTube channel has a set of drone footage of nine sites in Yorkshire of geological interest. Look at the Playlist option. It starts at Brimham Rocks.

 https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzBPkcmYZbbLnaez7_tuohg

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzBPkcmYZbbLnaez7_tuohg/playlists

b) Virtual Events and Talks

Geologists’ Association has a free Festival of Geology set of four talks on 7th November.

Festival of Geology 2021

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/geologists-association-virtual-festival-of-geology-and-public-lectures-tickets-125443182937

The Yorkshire Geological Society has an online lecture on Tuesday 10th November 4pm.Other future talks are also listed

Geology of the Cononish Gold Deposit and Exploring for Gold in Scotland

https://www.yorksgeolsoc.org.uk/events.   

https://www.yorksgeolsoc.org.uk/events/online-lecture-cononish-gold

The Geological Society has its past public lectures available to view at any time. I suggest Public Lecture Jan 2020: How and why the Earth is different, Nick Rogers

2.      Women and Men in Geology: (See Paul Hildreth’s four talks on the chalk of Flamborough)

George Lamplugh (1859-1926) was an East Riding boy who became one of the most eminent British geologists and palaeontologists of his age. Born in Driffield and grew up in Bridlington. He examined the glacial deposits and cretaceous strata before taking a professional role with the Geological Survey in 1892.

YPS have biographic notes and references on the website. George Lamplugh

Hull Geological Society have notes on a talk about Lamplugh’s study of the Quaternary of East Yorkshire by John Catt http://www.hullgeolsoc.co.uk/workof.htm

3.      Online Study:

Liam Herringshaw reports the new website of Hidden Horizons and the Fossil Shop in Scarborough. They are offering a course on An Introduction to Fossils, over three Tuesday nights in November. £35 including a set of quality replica fossils.

An Introduction to Fossils – Online Course Autumn 2020

Liam and HH also offer fossil-hunting trips.

4.      Trips outside (self-guided)

In these days when so much is closed, it is still possible to examine a wide range of building stones by examining the outside of churches. A trip towards Boroughbridge is rewarding.

Church towers often contain the oldest stones (in terms of quarrying, if not deposition) and several such towers locally contain Roman, Anglo-Saxon, Medieval and Modern stones.

·       Holy Trinity Little Ouseburn (WR, now North Yorkshire) south of Boroughbridge, with its Anne Bronte connections and extraordinary C18th rotunda mausoleum to the Thompson family. The tower contains a band of bright red local Triassic sandstones.

https://www.crsbi.ac.uk/quick-search?q=little%20ouseburn&WINID=1603731069027

https://www.yorkpress.co.uk/news/10920957.visiting-a-north-yorkshire-church-attended-by-anne-bronte/

http://www.english-church-architecture.net/n%20york%20l/little%20ouseburn/little_ouseburn.htm

All Saints’ Kirby Hill (or Kirby on the Moor) (NR) just north of Boroughbridge.

The base of the tower has a large gritstone block with a rather eroded Latin inscription. The porch has a number of early carved blocks embedded in the walls.

The door contains ancient ironwork, possibly C12. If you are lucky enough to find the church open, the tower contains four magnificent Anglo-Saxon carvings. The strong suggestion is of an ancient church rebuilt from an even older stone one.

https://www.crsbi.ac.uk/view-item?key=WXsiUCI6eyJUZXJtcyI6ImFsbCBzYWludHMga2lyYnkgaGlsbCJ9LCJGIjoiZXlKMElqcGJObDE5In0&WINID=1603731517868#y_liP-4sqksAAAF06bKhcg/11437

http://www.ascorpus.ac.uk/catvol6.php?pageNum_urls=141

http://www.allsaintskirbyhill.org.uk/heritage/heritage.htm

5.      Our Museum of the Month:

Whitby Museum in Pannett Park is open at present. It has an important collection of marine fossils, land fossils from Kirkdale Cave as well as jet and other pieces.

6.      Books and Mags

John Phillips, The Rivers, Mountains and Sea-Coast of Yorkshire, published 1853. Recommended by Colin Speakman as a never-bettered description of the county.

Available as a Google ebook or as a reproduction of the text from Amazon or elsewhere

https://play.google.com/books/reader?id=f96BAAAAMAAJ&hl=en_GB&pg=GBS.PP8

Paul Thornley, 26/10/20

Covid Notes for October 2020

Where there is a huge amount of choice on a website, I have chosen only one or two activities.

1.      a) Virtual Trips:

The Yorkshire Geological Society have a geological excursion of Staithes to Port Mulgrave on the North Yorkshire coast. This uses Google Earth. This shows the coast and rock strata very beautifully with extra information linked to each page. The link to this and to Ian West’s website on the geology of the Staithes area:https://www.yorksgeolsoc.org.uk/virtualfieldtrips/virtualgeologytours

http://www.southampton.ac.uk/~imw/staithes.htm

The Yorkshire Rocks and Landscape Field Guide chapter on The Lower Jurassic rocks between Staithes and Port Mulgrave, on which the excursion is based, is available at

http://earthwise.bgs.ac.uk/index.php/Lower_Jurassic_rocks_between_Staithes_and_Port_Mulgrave_-_an_excursion

b) Virtual Talks

Liam Herringshaw has a lively and informative Centre for Lifelong Learning talk about York and the rocks that make the city on Youtube. This was recorded in 2015. Not a lot has changed! York: A Rocky History

A reminder of Liam’s other talk about the life of John Phillips, the first keeper of the Yorkshire Museum and later Professor of geology at Oxford. On Youtube.

The Time Lord of York.              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lhyrad1yLx8

The Geological Society has its past public lectures available. I suggest September 2019. The Big Antarctic Freeze about Antarctic ice over the past 34 million years https://www.geolsoc.org.uk/antarcticfreeze

The Geologists’ Association has a wealth of material available on its Geology from your Sofa.  Lectures, courses, field trips….. https://geologistsassociation.org.uk/sofageology/#latest

Try the extraordinary photographic tour of the geology of the Colorado River by raft https://www.usgs.gov/science-support/osqi/yes/national-parks/colorado-river-raft-tour

2.      Women and Men in Geology:

In 2019, The Geological Society celebrated the centenary of the (belated) admission of the first female fellows to the Society. At the bottom of the link to Margaret Crosfield are links to the other six fellows. The details give accounts of the geological interests and research of each of the seven.

100 years of female Fellows: Margaret Crosfield

3.      Online Study:

Manchester University offers an online course on Our Earth: Its Climate, History, and Processes. https://www.coursera.org/learn/our-earth

4.      Trips outside (self-guided)

If it is not too morbid at this time, there are two outstanding guides to geology walks in cemeteries.

Hull, Spring Bank Cemetery from Anne and Mike Horne for Hull Geological Society https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5ebc647c0446723b32229119/t/5f33cd569a3f19454e96cea8/1597230463357/HullCemeteryWalkV1

and York Cemetery, by the Friends of York Cemetery. (Other guides are on their website) https://www.yorkcemetery.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/York-Cemetery-Geology-Trail-Dec-2017.pdf

5.      Our Museum of the Month:

The Lapworth Museum at the University of Birmingham reopened in the past couple of years after an extensive reorganisation. (Currently closed, hoping to open soon.) The collection is outstanding and the there is much to see on the website and the archive of the geologist Charles Lapworth, who named the Ordovician System. https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/facilities/lapworth-museum/index.aspx

6.      Books and Mags

Yorkshire Geology by Paul Ensom is the indispensable guide to the county/counties.

Paul Ensom is a former Keeper of Geology at the Yorkshire Museum before moving to Natural History Museum. The guide wears its scholarship lightly, welcoming the reader into the natural forces that have shaped the varied landscapes of the historic county. It places the study of geological methods and current debates in the context of the important sites that can be visited. The illustrations are excellent. Review and book (available second hand) https://www.yorkpress.co.uk/news/4301123.yorkshire-geology-paul-ensom-dovecote-press-22-50/

https://www.abebooks.co.uk/servlet/SearchResults?isbn=9781904349648&cm_sp=mbc-_-ISBN-_-all

Paul Thornley 2/10/20

Covid Notes for September 2020

Where there is a huge amount of choice on a website, I have chosen only one or two activities as a focus.

1 a) Virtual Trips:

The Yorkshire Geological Society have a geology and poetry virtual trip to Widdup Moor above Hebden Bridge. Google Earth and Ted Hughes. https://www.yorksgeolsoc.org.uk/virtualfieldtrips/virtualgeologytours

For those who viewed last month’s four geological walks around Flamborough Head, they may wish to read:

The Stratigraphy of the Chalk Group in Yorkshire and Lincolnshire, MG.Sumbler http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/509937/1/WA99002.pdf

A history of the Yorkshire Wolds since the chalk was formed, Derek Gobbett http://www.hullgeolsoc.co.uk/hg1521.htm

b) Virtual Talks

Liam Herringshaw has some family talks with academic links on his Fossilhub site, Chalking with Dinosaurs parts 1-4. https://fossilhub.org/chalking-with-dinosaurs-part-2/  Liam has a York University Public talk on John Phillips on YouTube, The Time Lord of York.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lhyrad1yLx8

The Geological Society has its past public lectures available. I suggest:- November 2019: Volcanoes and past climate – Tamsin Mather

June 2020: Strategies in times of crisis – lessons from past marine ecosystems – Daniela Schmidt.          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VQZrW_ZodI0&t=321s

The Geologists’ Society has made its lectures available at present. I suggest:- October 2019: Searching for an impact crater in Scotland – Mike Simms

GA Video Lectures

July 2020: The weird and wonderful world of sedimentology – Jon Noad

GA Video Lectures

2.  Women and Men in Geology:

Marie Tharp and Bruce Heezen. Marie Tharp developed the maps of the Atlantic Ocean floor that generated plate tectonic theory and underpinned continental drift in the 1950’s.

https://theconversation.com/marie-tharp-pioneered-mapping-the-bottom-of-the-ocean-6-decades-ago-scientists-are-still-learning-about-earths-last-frontier-142451

https://www.geosociety.org/gsatoday/archive/27/6/pdf/i1052-5173-27-6-32.pdf

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/news/2017/02/marie-tharp-map-ocean-floor/

The last has a nice little cartoon of her discoveries.

Extra: Watch the Royal Ballet School pupils perform Plate Tectonics!

3.      Online Study:

This OpenLearn (Open University) course may be started any time and is free: Geological Processes in the British Isles (9 hours) https://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/geology/geological-processes-the-british-isles/content-section-0?active-tab=description-tab

Geosupplies of Sheffield has an educational arm, Down to Earth. They offer paid-for courses that may be taken online or with material through the post. Where there’s Muck – an economic geology of Britain. (other courses are available)

https://www.geosupplies.co.uk/acatalog/Educational-Courses.html

https://www.geosupplies.co.uk/learning-zone.php#online

4.      Trips outside (self-guided)

If you are heading up to Hadrian’s Wall and the Great Whin Sill, YGS features a prize-winning introductory field guide by an undergraduate at University of Newcastle, Caitlin Leverett. This may be printed and taken with you.  https://www.yorksgeolsoc.org.uk/whinsillguide

YGS Field Guide, Yorkshire Rocks and Landscapes, chapter 5 has a tour of Upper Nidderdale available on the BGS Earthwise site. (I have walked there several times recently.) Carboniferous rocks of upper Nidderdale – an excursion. http://earthwise.bgs.ac.uk/index.php/Carboniferous_rocks_of_upper_Nidderdale_-_an_excursion

5. Our Museum of the Month (two of them this time, both rather folksy!)

Nidderdale Museum in Pateley Bridge has a small collection on minerals, quarrying and lead mining.               http://www.nidderdalemuseum.com/

Swaledale Museum in Reeth has a strong focus on minerals and lead mining and has much to see.               http://www.swaledalemuseum.org/collection.html

6.      Books and Mags

Tony Waltham was to speak in York this Spring on The Yorkshire Dales, his The Yorkshire Dales, Landscape and Geology, The Crowood Press, ISBN 978-1861269720, is a wonderful account of how the landscape of caves, moors and valleys come to look as it does.

Richard Bell’s Yorkshire Rock: A Journey Through Time is elementary but very clear, with excellent illustrations. ISBN  978-0852722695. Published by the British Geological Society.

Geosupplies produces a quarterly magazine, Down to Earth. Read by many amateur geologists and earth studies students. A subscription is not expensive. A free trial is available. https://www.geosupplies.co.uk/down-to-earth-magazine.php

https://www.geosupplies.co.uk/acatalog/Down-to-Earth.html

Paul Thornley

28/08/20  

For August:

1.     Virtual Trips:

The Yorkshire Geological Society have four virtual geological walks on the chalk at the coast from Speeton to Sewerby. Find the You Tube site via:

https://www.yorksgeolsoc.org.uk/virtualfieldtrips/videogeologyguides

Paul Hildreth, the current President of YGS, narrates four films about the geology at or near Flamborough Head.

We recommend that you subscribe to the channel so that you can go back to it more easily. A subscription to the YGS is also very good value, but not necessary for viewing the films.

The BGS geology map of the area, giving the different chalk strata is at:

http://www.largeimages.bgs.ac.uk/iip/mapsportal.html?id=1001536

2.     Women in Geology:

Etheldred Benett was a great collector and student of UK fossils in the early nineteenth century, at ease with sharing ideas and opinions valued by other renowned geologists. She was honoured with a Doctorate in Civil Law of the University of St Petersburg by Tsar Nicholas I.

The YPS and Yorkshire Museum hosted Emily Markham, an MA student and some of her research on Etheldred Benett may be seen on the YPS website:

Etheldred Benett and the Making of Museums

3.     Online Study:

For anyone wanting to undertake a short course in geology, there are two available this month, free to join. The OpenLearn course may be started any time. The FutureLearn is a live course starting this month but can be joined soon after the start.

OpenLearn (from the Open University) Introduction to Geology https://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/free-courses?filter=date/grid/672/all/all/all/

Other subjects are available!

FutureLearn, on the past five mass extinction events

https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/extinctions-past-present

4.     Trips outside:

If anyone wants to get out and look at some fossils, Hidden Horizons are offering guided trips at the coast, through Eventbrite:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/o/hidden-horizons-5979675763

(Liam Herringshaw says he will be assisting on 7th and 21st August and 3rd September.)

5.     Our Museum of the Month

The Rotunda Museum of Scarborough. Built with advice from William Smith and John Phillips as a Geology Museum. View aspects of the geology and archaeology collections online and the Museum will reopen on 8th August

Rotunda Museum

Please note: The Fossil Festival planned for Scarborough in September has been cancelled.

Paul Thornley

31/07/20